7 Things to Know Before Adopting a Boston Terrier - Simply For Dogs
Adopting Boston Terrier

7 Things to Know Before Adopting a Boston Terrier

THIS POST MAY CONTAIN AFFILIATE LINKS. PLEASE READ MY DISCLOSURE FOR MORE INFO.

If you’ve been looking into adopting a new puppy, there are tons of things to consider. However, if you are planning on getting a dapper Boston Terrier, there are a few specific things to keep in mind. These are great family dogs that are often wonderful with kids and visitors. But there are some things about this breed to know. Here’s a guide to this breed that can help you decide if adopting one is right for you.

Dog’s Products on Amazon

Hyper Pet Tennis Balls for Dogs, Pet Safe Dog Toys for Exercise and Training, Pack of 4, Green
EcoCity Upgrade Version Dog Training Clicker with Wrist Strap, 4-Pack
Hyper Pet Tennis Balls for Dogs, Pet Safe Dog Toys for Exercise and Training, Pack of 4, Green
EcoCity Upgrade Version Dog Training Clicker with Wrist Strap, 4-Pack
$5.10
$6.99
-
-
Hyper Pet Tennis Balls for Dogs, Pet Safe Dog Toys for Exercise and Training, Pack of 4, Green
Hyper Pet Tennis Balls for Dogs, Pet Safe Dog Toys for Exercise and Training, Pack of 4, Green
$5.10
-
EcoCity Upgrade Version Dog Training Clicker with Wrist Strap, 4-Pack
EcoCity Upgrade Version Dog Training Clicker with Wrist Strap, 4-Pack
$6.99
-

Last update on 2018-11-20 at 13:44 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Boston Terriers at a Glance

Boston Terriers live for around 12 to 14 years on average, and don’t get much taller than one and a half feet tall. They usually weigh less than 25 pounds, and most weigh even less than 20. These dogs are in the top 25 most popular breeds in America, according to the AKC, and their personalities are usually summed up as amusing, fun, and friendly. Because of their tuxedo coats and the fact that they are generally pretty friendly and fun, they are sometimes called the “American Gentleman”.

Now let’s get to the things you need to know before you adopt one of these cute little guys.

(1) Boston Terriers Do Have Eye Problems

Many people love the look of the round, slightly bulbous eyes that the Boston Terrier has. They have a very bright, doll-like look that makes this breed look like an eternal puppy. However, because of the shape and protruding structure of the dog’s eyes, they are prone to more eye problems than other breeds.

The most common problem is corneal ulcers, which are caused when something gets into the eye (like a blade of grass blowing in the wind). Most dog’s eyes are protected by the rim of the eyelid that circles the eye, and the fact that their eye is set more deeply into the skull. However, the Boston Terrier eye shape and structure means that it’s easy for debris to touch the eye itself and create problems.

There are also inherited eye problems that are common in this breed, such as juvenile cataracts. You should always be careful to get a dog from a breeder that has verified their dog’s eyesight using CERF. If you are adopting from a shelter, take the dog to the vet and get their eyes examined for any immediate issues – and stay on top of eye exams to prevent problems in the future.

Related Content:

11 Reasons to Adopt a Shelter Dog
How to Adopt a Rescue Dog
7 Signs That You Are Ready to Adopt a Dog

(2) Boston Terriers Are Very Smart and Competitive

Boston Terriers have two distinct characteristics that make them great in canine sports – they are very smart, and they love to please people. Those two traits combined mean that they train easily and that they understand how to improvise in new situations. For people who are interested in canine sports, Boston Terriers do great with things such as:

  • Flyball, which involves catching a tennis ball, leaping over hurdles, and zooming down a racing course.
  • Obedience games, in which dogs have to follow commands that range from basic verbal commands to hand signals from a distance.
  • Agility games, in which dogs have to navigate obstacle courses that include weaving through poles, walking on a see-saw, and so on.

This combination of traits also makes Boston Terriers good therapy and service dogs. These dogs are often used in hospitals that allow canine emotional support therapies, and they are also frequently suggested as good companions for the elderly.

(3) Boston Terriers Are Good for Allergy-Prone Dog Lovers

If you are looking for a dog that won’t cause an allergy sufferer to have serious problems, a Boston Terrier is a pretty good choice. They have short, smooth coats that don’t tend to shed too much, and they don’t require much grooming. They also don’t tend to be very smelly, aren’t prone to excessive drooling, and don’t need a bath more than maybe once every few months. They tend to stay clean.

In fact, the only weekly thing you’ll need to do is to check a Boston Terrier’s toenails and trim them if they get long, and brush their teeth to prevent them from having bad oral health. They are also low maintenance when it comes to exercise. They do need exercise daily, but they won’t mind if you don’t have hours and hours for long hikes and extreme play time. Just a good walk and some mild playtime every day will be enough to keep a Boston Terrier happy. These are excellent dogs to have in an apartment.

Adopting Boston Terrier

(4) Boston Terriers Probably Won’t Be a Great Guard Dog

Boston Terriers are very friendly, even to strangers. If you want a dog that will just alert you to someone new showing up – by barking, jumping around, and generally getting excited to meet a new friend – then this breed would do just fine. But if you expect your dog to actually guard your house, and make newcomers check in before they just come into your house, then you won’t find that here. Boston Terriers were bred to be companions, and their friendly natures are hard to overcome.

However, this does mean good things if you have lots of visitors or children’s friends that come over often. The Boston Terrier is always happy to welcome them inside.

(5) Boston Terriers Are Prone to Breathing and Knee Issues

There are two other medical issues that Boston Terriers are prone to beyond their eye health.

The first is anything to do with their breathing. As dogs with flat faces, Boston Terriers often have issues such as tracheal collapse, or diseases that affect their breathing during heavy exercise. These things can be surgically fixed, but it is essential that you watch a Boston Terrier for their breathing if you intend to adopt one. Make sure you listen for anything that sounds like a “goose cough” when they are excited – this is an indication of a weak trachea.

Another health problem that Boston Terriers can often have is luxating patella, a condition in which the kneecap doesn’t always stay in place. This issue doesn’t usually cause pain or any long-term effects, but it may need to be surgically corrected if it does start to impact the dog’s mobility.

(6) Boston Terriers Aren’t Good for People Who Work Long Hours

For the most part, the Boston Terrier is a pretty adaptable pet. They are good with kids, good with elderly owners, good in families, good with single people, good in apartments, and not hard to train or adjust to a new home if you have to move. However, the one thing that they aren’t good for is people who must leave their dog alone for long periods of time. Boston Terriers like to snuggle and be around you. Their friendly natures are a big clue that they love to be around people. If you have long work hours, you often travel for work, or you have a hectic life that the dog couldn’t join you in outside of the home, you may be better suited seeking a different breed.

(7) Boston Terriers are an All-American Dog

If you are the sort of person that likes having a dog that was created and bred right here in America, you’re in luck. These dogs were initially created from breeding a bulldog with an English Terrier in Boston, Massachusetts, in the late 1800s. The first dog considered to be the ancestor of all Boston Terriers was named Judge. The dogs were initially called Round Heads or Bullet Heads because of their unique head shape. Some also called them Bull Terriers due to their mixture of breeds. But by the time 1890 rolled around, Boston had officially claimed the dog and given them its name. It was in 1893 that the AKC recognized this breed, and the rest is history.

Another fun fact about this dog’s round head that you may want to know if you intend to breed: Most Boston Terrier litters have to be delivered via C-section because the puppy heads are too bulbous to be passed through the birthing canal.

The dog became a famous companion for many historical figures throughout the years. Helen Keller had a Boston Terrier, as did many other historical figures.

Are You Ready for a Boston Terrier?

Now that you know a bit more about this tenacious little breed, it’s time to ask yourself if a Boston Terrier would be right for you. Here are some things to consider:

  • Do you have a training plan for your dog? Boston Terriers are smart, but they do need you to start training them early. Intelligent dogs that aren’t trained tend to form habits that you don’t want them to have. Consider whether you’ll use a , training treats, obedience classes, or some other method.
    clicker
  • Do you have enough time to spend with a dog? You don’t have to be always on the run with this dog, as they don’t require tons of exercise – but they do need regular interaction and snuggle time. They aren’t the best breed to leave alone for long days.
  • Do you enjoy amusing antics and friendly companionship? Boston Terriers are little hams that like to have your attention. They often do ridiculous things and are always up for being right on your tail as you move around the house. If that sounds annoying rather than entertaining, consider getting a different breed.
  • Are you able to provide potentially expensive veterinary care to the dog? Boston Terriers do tend to have issues with their eyes, and sometimes issues with their breathing as well. This could lead to some pricey vet bills in the future. Consider pet insurance if you aren’t sure that you could cover an emergency.
  • Do you need a dog that you can handle with limited mobility? The Boston Terrier doesn’t need a lot of grooming or care, and they are known for being great therapy dogs in hospital wards and with children. If you want a dog, but you have worried that limited mobility would prevent them from getting proper care, this could be a good breed for you.
  • Are you interested in canine sports? Boston Terriers would be perfectly happy without being involved in a sport – but they do make great competitors. If you like the idea of having a dog that wins trophies, this breed may be great for you.
  • Do you want a dog that can be both a playmate for the kids and a lap dog for you? Many small lap dog breeds aren’t great with kids. Boston Terriers are the perfect compromise.

If you answered all those questions and the idea of a Boston Terrier makes you think that you’d be the perfect pair, then you are ready to adopt!

Dog’s Products on Amazon

Hyper Pet Tennis Balls for Dogs, Pet Safe Dog Toys for Exercise and Training, Pack of 4, Green
EcoCity Upgrade Version Dog Training Clicker with Wrist Strap, 4-Pack
Hyper Pet Tennis Balls for Dogs, Pet Safe Dog Toys for Exercise and Training, Pack of 4, Green
EcoCity Upgrade Version Dog Training Clicker with Wrist Strap, 4-Pack
$5.10
$6.99
-
-
Hyper Pet Tennis Balls for Dogs, Pet Safe Dog Toys for Exercise and Training, Pack of 4, Green
Hyper Pet Tennis Balls for Dogs, Pet Safe Dog Toys for Exercise and Training, Pack of 4, Green
$5.10
-
EcoCity Upgrade Version Dog Training Clicker with Wrist Strap, 4-Pack
EcoCity Upgrade Version Dog Training Clicker with Wrist Strap, 4-Pack
$6.99
-

Last update on 2018-11-20 at 13:44 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

The Final Word

This little breed is one of the best all-around dog breeds that are out there. They are great with just about any type of owner, they don’t require a ton of grooming or exercise, but they are happy to have fun and be active if that’s what you want.

The biggest thing to know about this breed is that you do need to keep an eye on their health, especially their breathing and their eyes. If your dog gets active, their breathing could become labored, and that’s not a good sign.

I’ve known quite a few Boston Terriers in my life. I know families who have them, elderly retired people who have them, kids who go everywhere with the family’s Boston Terrier, young college kids with Boston Terriers, and everything in between. They make great team mascots, great dogs for busy households, and great therapy dogs.

But it is essential that potential owners know about the health problems that flat-faced dogs can have. If you’ve got your heart set on a Boston Terrier, be sure you have a vet on call, and that you are able to keep an eye on your dog’s well being. Otherwise, have a great time with your friendly new companion!

Related Content:

11 Reasons to Adopt a Shelter Dog
How to Adopt a Rescue Dog
7 Signs That You Are Ready to Adopt a Dog

Sources:

http://www.vetstreet.com/dogs/boston-terrier#history

http://www.animalplanet.com/pets/5-things-you-didnt-know-about-the-boston-terrier/

https://www.vetbabble.com/dogs/breeds-dogs/boston-terrier/

About the Author admin