13 Ways to Spoil Your Dog with a Bake-A-Bone - Simply For Dogs
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13 Ways to Spoil Your Dog with a Bake-A-Bone

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Dog’s Bake Bone On Amazon

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Bake-A-Bone
Dog Cake Mix
Silicone Muffin Pan
Hey there, it’s Ash here. How many times have I told you on this blog that I am a bit lazy in the kitchen? It’s true that when we’re talking about feeing myself, I’m more the sandwich type – but when it comes to Janice and Leroy, I’ve made more of an effort. A while ago, we talked about how I was trying out a dehydrator to make dog treats, and can report that both of my pups loved the results. It saved me a ton of money in dog treats, which was great; but it also may have started a tiny obsession with dog treat gadgets, which may be a little less great for my budget.

That being said, let me introduce you to my latest gizmo: the Bake-A-Bone. This is a countertop gadget that looks a lot like a Panini press, with bone-shaped holes for batter inside. You press in dough or batter, close the lid, and let the device turn your goopy mess into tasty treats for the dogs. These do tend to come out soft at first, but you can either let them sit longer to get crunchy, or take the easy way out like I do and toss them into a hot oven for a couple minutes too. Not that my dogs mind the chewy treats either.

I love this thing so much, it’s a little ridiculous, and today I wanted to share with you 13 of my favorite recipes to make dog bones in a Bake-A-Bone. While the company does sell Dog Cake Mix that you only need to add water to, I like being able to tweak the sodium content, add more protein, or fiddle with recipes to suit Janice and Leroy’s taste buds better. Many of these come from the official Bake-A-Bone recipe book, but a few are my own tweaks.

Recipe Instructions and Tips

For all of these recipes, the instructions are the same. Plug in your Bake-A-Bone and wait for the green indicator light to come on. Mix all the ingredients well, and spoon the batter into the bone molds. Then close and bake about 10 minutes. Cool for about 30 minutes before giving to your dog. Here’s a hint: to avoid the bottoms getting soggy, cool on a cooling rack, not on a plate.

Any time you see a broth ingredient, be sure you’re using the reduced sodium version of that product. Dogs’ systems can’t handle the heavy amounts of sodium in the standard version.

1. Chick ‘n Bones

Chicken is a favorite of Leroy’s, so I knew I had to try this recipe out first. We’ve made it several times since then.

2 cups whole wheat flour or all-purpose flour

½ cup reduced sodium chicken broth

1 cup milk

1 1/2 cups shredded cooked chicken

1 tablespoon baking powder

1 tablespoon softened butter

2. Cottage Cheesy Bones

A different take on a “cheesy” bone, this recipe uses cottage cheese for a creamy, protein-packed snack.

1 cup whole wheat flour or all-purpose flour

1 cup oatmeal

1 ½ cup milk

1 tablespoon baking powder

1 tablespoon vegetable oil

2/3 cup cottage cheese

1 egg yolk

3. Beef and Barley Biscuits

A beefy, savory treat that Janice particularly loved. Be sure not to use garlic salt in place of garlic powder! Dogs don’t need that extra sodium.

2 cups whole wheat flour or all-purpose flour

1 cup milk

1 tablespoon baking powder

1 tablespoon vegetable oil

1 teaspoon garlic powder (NOTE: Do not use garlic salt!)

2 tablespoons parsley

½ cup beef broth

4. Carrot Cakes

Carrots are great for a dog’s eyesight and oral health, and this recipe also includes heart-healthy cinnamon. However, if you are feeding this to a puppy, omit the honey! Honey should only be fed to dogs over two years old.

2 cups of whole wheat flour or all-purpose flour

1 ½ cup milk

1 tablespoon baking powder

1 cup shredded carrots

½ teaspoon cinnamon

1 tablespoon honey

5. Liver Bones

Once again, be sure to not accidentally substitute garlic salt in this one! Both Janice and Leroy heartily approve of anything with liver in it, so this one is a hit. I admit I’m not fond of the smell, but I’d do a lot of things to make my dogs happy.

2 cups whole wheat flour or all-purpose flour

1 ½ cup water

1 tablespoon baking powder

1 cup pureed liver

½ teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon garlic powder

1 egg, beaten

6. Birthday Cake Bones

Want to make something special for your dog’s birthday? This recipe turns into a frosted dog “cake”. Just be sure to omit the honey for a puppy under two.

For the bone:

2 cups whole wheat flour or all-purpose flour

1 ½ cup milk

1 tablespoon baking powder

1 teaspoon salt

1 egg, beaten

For the frosting:

12 ounces’ non-fat cream cheese

2 teaspoons honey

Once you’ve cooked the bones as usual, just mix up the frosting ingredients and spread them on the bone.

7. Ground Beef Biscuits

This one does take a little more time, similar to the chicken recipe, because you’ll need precooked meat. If this bone becomes a favorite at your house, you may want to get into the habit of setting aside some totally plain ground beef every time you’re cooking up some tacos for yourself.

2 cups whole wheat flour or all-purpose flour

1 ½ cup milk

1 tablespoon baking powder

1/3-pound browned ground beef

1 teaspoon garlic powder (NOT garlic salt…yes, I will keep harping on this to death. Sodium is not a dog’s friend!)

1 egg, beaten

8. Salmon Bones

Salmon is one of the healthiest treats you can give a dog, and mine seem to love it.

2 cups whole wheat flour or all-purpose flour

1 ½ cup milk

1 8-ounce can salmon, drained

½ cup minced parsley or parsley flakes

1 tablespoon baking powder

9. Pot Roast Bones

Is there anything more mouth-watering than a pot roast? Dogs are usually big fans of this Sunday dinner classic in my experience. This recipe probably includes a few things you don’t have around the house, but they are easy and cheap to find.

2 cups whole wheat or all-purpose flour

1 ¼ cup milk

1 tablespoon baking powder

1 jar vegetable-and-beef baby food, strained (Note: Be sure to check that this does not have onion powder in it, as onion can be very dangerous for dogs.)

1 cup rice

1 package unflavored gelatin

1 egg, beaten

2 tablespoons vegetable oil

1 beef bouillon cube, dissolved in ¼ cup water (If you can find lower or reduced sodium cubes, use those instead.)

10. Peanut Butter Bone

If there is one treat that stands above the rest in the opinion of Janice, it’s peanut butter. Any time I even stand too close to a jar, she starts wagging her tail and licking her chops. I can’t say that I blame her, either.

2 cups whole wheat flour or all-purpose flour

1 tablespoon baking powder

1 cup peanut butter

2 cups milk

1 cup water

11. Thanksgiving Leftover Bone

Once Thanksgiving rolls back around again, you’ll thank me for this recipe. There always seems to be way more turkey than anyone was expecting at my family gatherings, so guess who gets sent home with “a few pieces for the dogs” to free up space in the fridge? Here’s what I did with them last year:

2 cups whole wheat or all-purpose flour

1 ½ cup milk

1 tablespoon baking powder

1 cup shredded leftover cooked turkey

1 tablespoon vegetable oil

1 teaspoon salt

½ teaspoon garlic powder (NOT garlic salt)

12. Tuna Bones

Just like salmon, tuna is filled with great fatty acids that help dogs develop healthier immune systems and organs. Tuna’s also a cheap way to add more protein to your dog’s diet.

2 cups whole wheat or all-purpose flour

1 ½ cup milk

1 tablespoon baking powder

1 can tuna, drained

1 egg, beaten

13. Molasses Bones

This recipe threw me for a loop at first, but the mixture of ingredients actually turned into something that both dogs are addicted to.

1 cup whole wheat flour or all-purpose flour

1 cup cornmeal

1 tablespoon baking powder

1 cup milk

2 tablespoons molasses

½ teaspoon garlic powder (NOT garlic salt)

½ cup beef broth, or beef bouillon dissolved in water

A Note on Dogs Eating Human Food

In a more recent post, I noted that dogs aren’t people, so they don’t need to be fed people food. But here’s the thing: dog food is essentially made out of the same stuff as our food – it’s just presented in a way that is better for a dog’s system. Less sodium, more protein, fewer or no additive chemicals, all make dog food better for your furry friend.

Feeding them these dog bones isn’t the same as handing them a piece of Little Caser’s Pizza off your plate. These dog bones are made of ingredients that you control, and that you have double checked are good for your dog. Throughout this post, I mentioned a few times that you should watch the sodium content, and that dogs younger than two shouldn’t eat honey. It’s a good idea to know which foods are bad for dogs if you intend to make your own homemade dog snacks.

Some no-no’s for dogs include:

  • Chocolate
  • Raisins or grapes
  • Tomatoes
  • Onion and onion powder
  • Apple seeds (apple flesh is okay)
  • Sugar
  • Fat trimmings
  • Alcohol (You would think that’s a no brainer, but I’ve known someone who frequently gave his dog Morty beer.)

If you plan to make your own dog treats, be sure to check out the post linked above, where I went into more detail about what dogs can and can’t eat when it comes to people food. Knowing these things will help ensure that your dog doesn’t become ill or worse from eating your treats.

Another Tool to Check Out

Before I go, I wanted to mention that the same company that makes the Bake-A-Bone also make a silicone muffin pan, where the holes are all shaped like bones. If you don’t want another gadget or gizmo cluttering up your kitchen cabinet, or you prefer smaller bones for a smaller dog, this could be a better option for you.

You can use the same recipes, just adjust the instructions to include baking the molds in the oven, rather than relying on the Bake-A-Bone to do it. This muffin pan is dishwasher-safe, oven-safe, and freezer-safe, so you can also use it to make icy cold treats like yogurt pops. You can also get a pan by the same company that looks like dog paws if you want to go all out. Doggie birthday party, anyone?

Dog’s Bake Bone On Amazon

Click Below To Go To Amazon Rating Price
Bake-A-Bone
Dog Cake Mix
Silicone Muffin Pan

The Final Verdict

I’ve had the Bake-A-Bone for almost a year now, and I have to say that I approve. It’s a lot of fun to experiment with recipes, and Janice and Leroy haven’t yet complained about the “mistake” batches I’ve had along the way. My only complaint would be that it doesn’t get the bones crunchy from the start, but that’s an easy fix.

None of these recipes require a special tool like this. You could just as easily use a spoon to plop the batter onto a cookie sheet like a cookie and bake it. It’s just fun to give out bone-shaped treats, and the fact that it takes under 10 minutes without heating up the kitchen is a big plus.

I’ve recently started experimenting with dried fruit, to see if I can come up with a sort of crunchy doggie fruit muffin. Blueberries, dried banana bits, and other ingredients are on the line up for the next batch. Keep in mind that any of these dog bones made with milk will spoil faster, and would probably do better if stored in the fridge.

I love this thing, and Janice and Leroy do too – give it a try with your dog and see what you think!

 

About the Author Ash

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